Cotes d'armor

By Paola.

awhoreforallseasons:

sixpenceee:

Chicago’s newest attraction - a 1000ft-high viewing platform that offers spectacular downward facing views over the city. TILT is housed in 360 CHICAGO on the 94th floor of the John Hancock Tower and, as the name suggests, the enclosed glass and steel platform tilts visitors forward for a unique perspective of the city’s The Magnificent Mile. (Source)

awhoreforallseasons:

sixpenceee:

Chicago’s newest attraction - a 1000ft-high viewing platform that offers spectacular downward facing views over the city. TILT is housed in 360 CHICAGO on the 94th floor of the John Hancock Tower and, as the name suggests, the enclosed glass and steel platform tilts visitors forward for a unique perspective of the city’s The Magnificent Mile. (Source)

blackbruise:

tiny little turn ons:

   - people leaning against walls with one shoulder while they talk

   - catching somebody turning away smiling at a joke you made

   - people who linger on a hug for just a second after you let go

   - somebody glancing at your lips while you’re talking

historiful:


“Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”
-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930. 

historiful:

Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”

-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930.